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Dear White Moms, I Need Your Help

You are my friends. You are my sisters. We are the same in more ways than we are different, but there are a few things that I need you to know.

Navigating the Mystery: Understanding Medically Unexplained Symptoms

Explore the complex world of medically unexplained symptoms (MUS), including chronic fatigue, IBS, and fibromyalgia. Learn about potential causes, examples, and effective management strategies to improve quality of life for those affected by MUS.

Recognizing the Signs of Depression: How to Identify in Someone You Love

Learn to recognize the subtle and overt signs of depression in your loved ones. This guide provides detailed insights on how to initiate conversations, encourage professional help, and provide ongoing support to those facing depression.

It Only Took One Time: 1 Minute After It Entered My System, “I Was Dead”

By Courta Nicole

When I was first introduced to heroin it was by my boyfriend at the time. We will just call him “Walter.” I wasn’t aware of his drug use prior to moving in, but as time went on I started to catch on, and within weeks I started to uncover what was truly going on behind the scenes.

Little did I know, I was about to dive head first into this black hole called “Heroin.” I use the term black hole because that’s exactly what it is. You start by peaking into the unknown, telling yourself at any moment you can stand up and run home. Never do you imagine yourself falling so far down, with nothing to hold on to and no one to call out to for help.

You’re just free falling—and then everything goes black.

Ever since I was a little girl my favorite movie has always been Alice in Wonderland. It’s ironic that this experience felt a lot like the plot of my favorite childhood movie. I was just a young girl, curious about the world around me. Curious of that black hole, and once I fell down, I was lost, just wanting to get home.

The first time I tried heroin was out of spite—out of anger and sadness. I didn’t understand why Walter couldn’t quit.

I’ll never forget that night.

I was crying and so upset. I locked myself in the bathroom of our apartment (where I found another stash hidden) and told Walter, “If you think this is okay to do to yourself, then you can watch what it does to me.”

It sounds so stupid now, I know. But that’s where I was. I was watching someone I cared for throw his life away. And for a second I thought maybe I could change his life. But the only life I changed that night was my own. It took me ONE time…one small line of brown powder, and I was hooked.

I convinced myself that everything was fine, I mean I wasn’t shooting the stuff up…that’s what the “real addicts do,” right?

No.

That’s where people are highly mistaken; just because you don’t have track marks on your arm doesn’t make you any better than the dope head sitting next to you with a needle in his vein, nodding off. I just happen to be a little queasy around needles, so I never went that route.

Four months into this addiction I found myself living a double life.

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I quit answering phone calls, I quit going home to see my parents, I shut myself off from the people I loved most. Because these are the people that can see through me, and I knew if I were to be around them they would know something was wrong. I was ashamed of who I was, I was ashamed of the person I had become. I never went a day without this drug for over a year.

Dear White Moms, I Need Your Help

You are my friends. You are my sisters. We are the same in more ways than we are different, but there are a few things that I need you to know.

Navigating the Mystery: Understanding Medically Unexplained Symptoms

Explore the complex world of medically unexplained symptoms (MUS), including chronic fatigue, IBS, and fibromyalgia. Learn about potential causes, examples, and effective management strategies to improve quality of life for those affected by MUS.

Recognizing the Signs of Depression: How to Identify in Someone You Love

Learn to recognize the subtle and overt signs of depression in your loved ones. This guide provides detailed insights on how to initiate conversations, encourage professional help, and provide ongoing support to those facing depression.