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12-Year-Old Girl Dies by Suicide After Being Relentlessly Bullied and Harassed at School

After facing relentless bullying and harassment over the past school year, 12-year-old Flora Martinez ended her life on May 7. Now, her parents are demanding change from schools and administrators after the bullying persisted, even once she was gone.

One Year After 26-Year-Old Wife Dies of Cancer, Husband Finds Redeeming Love After Loss With Young Widow

After his wife Maddy died of cancer at just 26 years old, Chandler David Smith was left grieving an unimaginable loss and navigating what it looked like to be a single dad. In his grief, he found new and beautiful love with a young widow and mother of three.

Florida ‘Safe Haven’ Baby Graduates High School, Reunites With Firefighters Who Received Her 18 Years Ago

Eighteen years ago, when she was just one day old, a baby named Colleen was surrendered at a “Safe Haven” box in Clermont, Florida. Now, as she successfully graduates high school, Colleen is reuniting with the firefighters who were with her on that fateful day 18 years ago.

Are We Are Living in a “Silent Depression?”: Why Everything Feels So Expensive in 2024

The term “Silent Depression” is increasingly used to describe the economic challenges that many households face today. While not as visible as the Great Depression of the 1930s, the current economic struggles manifest through stagnant wages, rising living costs, and increasing debt levels. By comparing household income and cost of living during the Great Depression with today’s economic conditions, we can see just how much of a toll the Silent Depression is having on this generation.

The Great Depression: A Historical Perspective

Household Income and Employment During the Great Depression, which lasted from 1929 to the late 1930s, the U.S. experienced unprecedented economic hardship. The unemployment rate soared to about 25% by 1933, meaning one in four Americans was out of work. Household income plummeted, with the average family earning around $1,500 per year, a significant drop from pre-Depression earnings.

Cost of Living The cost of living during the Great Depression also fell due to deflation, but this was little comfort to those without jobs. Essential goods like food and clothing became cheaper, but many families still struggled to afford them. For instance, a loaf of bread cost around 8 cents, and a gallon of milk was about 26 cents, but with drastically reduced incomes, these prices were still burdensome.

The Silent Depression: Modern Economic Struggles

Household Income Today Fast forward to today, the average household income in the U.S. is approximately $68,700 per year, according to recent data. While this figure seems significantly higher than during the Great Depression, it does not account for inflation and the higher cost of living. Moreover, income inequality has grown, with median wages stagnating for the middle and lower classes while the cost of essentials has risen.

Cost of Living Today The cost of living today has increased dramatically. Housing, healthcare, education, and childcare costs have all seen substantial hikes. For instance, the median home price in the U.S. is around $350,000, compared to about $3,900 in 1930 (adjusted for inflation, that’s roughly $60,000). Additionally, the average cost of a new car is over $40,000 today, compared to around $700 during the 1930s.

 

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Day-to-Day Cost of Living: Then and Now

Housing During the Great Depression, a modest home might cost between $3,000 and $6,000. Adjusted for inflation, that’s approximately $50,000 to $100,000 today. However, the current median home price of $350,000 indicates a significant disparity when considering modern wages.

Food A loaf of bread costing 8 cents in the 1930s would be roughly $1.50 today. However, the current average price for a loaf of bread is about $2.50 to $3.50, indicating that food costs have risen beyond simple inflation adjustments. This trend is echoed across many food items, making daily sustenance more expensive relative to income.

Healthcare Healthcare costs have surged dramatically. In the 1930s, healthcare was basic and inexpensive, often paid out-of-pocket with minimal insurance coverage. Today, healthcare expenses can be overwhelming, with the average annual premium for family health insurance coverage surpassing $20,000.

Education Higher education costs have skyrocketed. Tuition at public universities in the 1930s was negligible, often less than $100 per year. Today, the average annual tuition for in-state students at public universities is around $10,000, not including room and board.

Bri Lamm
Bri Lamm
Bri is an outgoing introvert with a heart that beats for adventure. She lives to serve the Lord, experience the world, and eat macaroni and cheese in between capturing life’s greatest moments on one of her favorite cameras.

12-Year-Old Girl Dies by Suicide After Being Relentlessly Bullied and Harassed at School

After facing relentless bullying and harassment over the past school year, 12-year-old Flora Martinez ended her life on May 7. Now, her parents are demanding change from schools and administrators after the bullying persisted, even once she was gone.

One Year After 26-Year-Old Wife Dies of Cancer, Husband Finds Redeeming Love After Loss With Young Widow

After his wife Maddy died of cancer at just 26 years old, Chandler David Smith was left grieving an unimaginable loss and navigating what it looked like to be a single dad. In his grief, he found new and beautiful love with a young widow and mother of three.

Florida ‘Safe Haven’ Baby Graduates High School, Reunites With Firefighters Who Received Her 18 Years Ago

Eighteen years ago, when she was just one day old, a baby named Colleen was surrendered at a “Safe Haven” box in Clermont, Florida. Now, as she successfully graduates high school, Colleen is reuniting with the firefighters who were with her on that fateful day 18 years ago.